The Most Powerful Way to Sustain Momentum

Five years ago Trent Grimsey swam the English Channel in a time of 6 hours and 55 minutes. It remains the fastest Channel swim ever.

After his epic swim, Trent was asked whether this was his greatest ever achievement.
Trent replied, “Not really. Learning to swim as a kid was my greatest achievement. Swimming didn’t come naturally to me and I almost gave up.”
He added, “The problem was that I was trying to swim the whole length of the pool in one go. Once I mastered swimming one metre, I aimed for 2m then 5m, then 10m, then 25m and kept going until today, when I swam 21 miles.”
Harvard researcher Teresa Amabile has found that making small, daily progress is the most powerful way to sustain momentum. Her research reveals that the most damaging thing to achieving big goals is to experience setbacks.
Psychologists refer to this effect as the goal gradient: the closer you get to something, the harder you’re willing to work to achieve it.
It would appear that we humans are more motivated by how much is left to reach our target, rather than how far we have come.

Humour

• If you combine “wine” and “dinner” you get winner.
• I have neither the time or the crayons to explain why you’re wrong.
• When I heard they had found a cure for dyslexia, it was music to my ar5e.

Live big & love deep.
Sunil

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